Books

I’ve written two books of poetry.

My poetry collection Songs for Ophelia came out from Papaveria Press in 2014. It features an introduction by Catherynne Valente and a cover illustration by Virginia Lee.

Songs for Ophelia

Here is the publisher’s description:

Songs for Ophelia gathers together eighty of Theodora’s otherworldly poems which lead the reader, as though under a spell, through the unfolding of the seasons and into the realm of pure magic. Delia Sherman, author of The Freedom Maze and Changeling, says about Songs for Ophelia, “Willows, dancing maidens, gypsies, mothers, lovers, daughters, magic animals, living waters, and transformations of all kinds abound in these gorgeous poems. With her formal prosody, her fairytale subjects, and her insights on love and loss and longing, Goss manages, Janus-like, to look back to the Victorians and inward at the heart of a modern woman with intelligence and grace.”

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Voices from Fairyland: The Fantastical Poems of Mary Coleridge, Charlotte Mew, and Sylvia Townsend Warner came out from Aqueduct Press in 2008. In this book, I collected some of my favorite poems by three women writers who should be better known. The book features essays by me on all three writers, as well as a selection of my own poems.

Voices from Fairyland

Here is the publisher’s description:

This volume features fantastical poems by Mary Coleridge, Charlotte Mew, and Sylvia Townsend Warner, accompanied by four fascinating essays and several poems by Dora Goss in conversation with Coleridge, Mew, and Warner’s poems. Goss writes that she chose to focus on these poets because “of all the poets I could have included they are the most talented among those whose talents have gone largely unrecognized.” Coleridge, Mew, and Warner, Goss argues, “are only three examples of what I consider a broader phenomenon, the rest of the ice that must be present, underwater, when we see icebergs floating on a northern sea. That underwater ice is the tradition of women writing fantastical poetry.” Goss’s essays explore important themes of that writing, and her poems are written in conversation with Coleridge, Mew, and Warner’s poems.

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